Monday, 7 November 2016

Pompeii Insula VI.1 the finds



I’m very pleased to announce that my report on the small finds and vessel glass from the 1995-2006 excavations in Insula VI.1 at Pompeii has just been published by Archaeopress in their Archaeopress Roman Archaeology series. This is accompanied by a digital component that the Archaeological Data Service is hosting.  I’ve written a website to accompany the publication and that can be found at http://www.pompeivi1.com/


The website provides links to the publisher and the ADS resource, as well as the various papers that have already been published on the material.  The most recent of those was ‘Recreation or decoration: what were the glass counters from Pompeii used for?’, Papers of the British School at Rome 84 (2016), 157-77.

Thursday, 29 September 2016

The Herculaneum Conservation Project on academia.edu

The Herculaneum Conservation Project team tries, whenever possible, to share information on our work with whoever is interested. Recently we have created an academia.edu page for our publications and have made available as many as possible for download. Please have a look at https://independent.academia.edu/HerculaneumConservationProject and let us know if you have any problems!

Saturday, 24 September 2016

New paper: 'Una nota di archeologia campana: il Dioniso nel tipo 'Sardanapalo' dalla villa imperiale del Pausilypon a Napoli'

The big marble statue of so called 'Dionysos Sardanapalos' in London British Museum since 1883, from the Pausilypon in Naples, need to clarify some important points as well as its definitive chronology. This paper tries to solve these problems, offering a detailed analysis of the marble statue and of the documenst about its finding story.

Friday, 9 September 2016

2016 Excavations at Pompeii: Porta Nola Necropolis

The Pompeii Porta Nola Necropolis Project, a joint collaboration between the British School at Rome, the Ilustre Colegio Oficial de Doctores y Licenciados en Letras y Ciencias de Valencia y Castellòn. Departamento de Arqueologia and the Museo de Prehistoria e Historia de La Diputación De Valencia has just posted a short blog on our recently concluded field season on the BSR blog:
https://britishschoolatrome.wordpress.com/2016/09/08/digging-pompeii-the-2016-summer-excavations/
More detailed reports to follow.

Thursday, 1 September 2016

Research scholarship on the “dark side” of Vesuvius - Call for applications



Research scholarship on the “dark side” of Vesuvius - Call for applications

The Apolline Project is a multi-disciplinary research project investigating the northern ‘dark side’ of Vesuvius examining several sites in the area as case studies for archaeological investigation of the ancient territories of Neapolis and Nola. Since its foundation in 2004 the project has yielded important results in various fields of study including archaeology, volcanology, and paleobotany (a complete list of publications is available here: http://www.apollineproject.org/academics/publications.html).

In the spirit of fostering research on the ancient territories of Neapolis and Nola we are delighted to announce that this year we will be able to offer four awards for fellow non-Italian researchers in the ongoing season. Thanks to the generosity of the AREC – the association of the former regional counsellors of Campania – there will be one scholarship of € 1000 and three of € 500 awarded, which will be used to support travel and research-related expenses. The candidates will be considered by a committee consisting of University professors, officers from the Superintendency, and a representative of the AREC.

The aim is to provide research worthy of publication, focusing on the study of archaeological remains from contexts following the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD in the ancient territories of Neapolis and Nola, with preference to those related to the so-called Villa of Augustus in Somma Vesuviana, the Villa with baths of Pollena Trocchia, and the other archaeological sites of this territory.

In order to be considered applicants must fit the following criteria:

                • Applicants must be enrolled at a university either as a post-graduate student or fellow.
                • Participation must be carried out during 2016.
                • Fields of research which will be considered for this award include archaeology, conservation, heritage management, public archaeology, and other subjects specifically related to the ancient territories of Neapolis and Nola.
                • Award holders are expected to submit a written report on the results of their work within a month of completion. In addition the researchers are asked to submit a digital copy of any publication or dissertation arising from this work to the archive of the Apolline Project and present the results on the events organised by project.
                • The successful candidates are expected to carry out the research in the place of the area of study (free accommodation can be provided by the Apolline Project).

How to apply

Applications will be considered on the basis of the following documents submitted by email to the Apolline Project at info@apollineproject.org by 16th September 2016. The application should include:

                • a curriculum vitae (maximum 3 pages);
                • a short description of the applicant’s university research and how the award would contribute to this research (maximum 1 page);
                • the contact details of two academic referees (only for post-graduates, unnecessary for established scholars).

In order to maintain a high level of professional research all applications will be carefully reviewed. In case the number of approved applications are lower than four, less scholarships will be awarded or the available funds with be redistributed as appropriate.

For any further information please contact Dr. Girolamo Ferdinando De Simone, director of the Apolline Project (info@apollineproject.org).

——————————————————
Dr. Girolamo F. De Simone
Director, Apolline Project

Thursday, 5 May 2016

Italy earmarks one billion euros for cultural investments.


Italy said Monday it was earmarking one billion euros for cultural investments, including restoration works in Pompeii, the Uffizi gallery in Florence and the earthquake-hit city of L'Aquila.

Culture Minister Dario Franceschini said it was the "biggest patrimony intervention in Italy's history", telling a press conference the funds would go to 33 projects in 13 regions of the country: "dreams, kept in drawers, which never had the necessary resources".

Some 40 million euros ($46 million) will go into the expansion of the Uffizi museum, in particular a plan to open to the public the "secret" Vasari Corridor, which connects the museum to the Palazzo Vecchio in Florence, and is currently only open to private tours.

Forty million euros goes to the ancient city of Pompeii, frozen in time after Mount Vesuvius erupted in 79AD, which spent much of the last decade in the headlines as Roman-era walls and mosaics crumbled away due to poor maintenance.

UNESCO World Heritage Site Herculaneum, a richer Pompeii with 75 percent of its ruins still unexcavated, will get 10 million euros.

Thirty million euros are earmarked for the historic centre of L'Aquila, the medieval town partially destroyed in a 2009 earthquake that killed 309 people, left around 65,000 homeless and toppled priceless churches and monuments.

Another 20 million euros will go to restoring the Paestum Museum in southern Italy on a site which boasts three of the best preserved Greek temples in the world, and 25 million euros is earmarked for the archaeological park at the Phlegraean Fields, or "burning fields", near Naples.

Franceschini described the "huge leap" in investments as "proof that this government believes in culture driving growth", adding that the cultural ministry had seen its funding increased 27 percent in 2016 from a year earlier.


Source Archaeology News Network
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